What is Hindsight Bias? How Does Hindsight Bias Apply to Marketing?

Also Known As: The “knew-it-all-along” effect, or creeping determinism. Definition: Hindsight bias happens when someone sees an event as predictable and happens as they guessed it would, even if they have little to no objective reason for making that prediction. Hindsight Bias Examples: Honest Marketing. Customers must hit a point where they select a product or….

What is Hindsight Bias? How Does Hindsight Bias Apply to Marketing?
What is Survivorship Bias? How Does Survivorship Bias Apply to Marketing?

What is Survivorship Bias? How Does Survivorship Bias Apply to Marketing?

Also Known As: Survival bias Definition: Survivorship bias occurs when we concentrate on people or companies that were “selected,” while overlooking those that were not selected because of their lack of visibility. Survivorship Bias Examples: Listening to Startup Survivors. The world of startups is full of stories of who made it, how, and why. We….

What is In-group Bias? How Does In-group Bias Apply to Marketing?

Also Known As: In-group favoritism, in-group–out-group bias, or intergroup bias Definition: In-group bias occurs when customers favor people who belong to a certain group that others are not a part of, the out-group members. In-group bias Examples: Facebook Groups. Communities can be valuable assets for companies. Putting time into building or joining a tribe leads to….

What is In-group Bias? How Does In-group Bias Apply to Marketing?
What is the Mere Exposure Effect? How Does Mere Exposure Effect Apply to Marketing?

What is the Mere Exposure Effect? How Does Mere Exposure Effect Apply to Marketing?

Also Known As: The familiarity principle Definition: The mere-exposure effect happens when customers have a preference for something, simply because they are familiar with it. Mere Exposure Effect Examples: Advertising. The mere exposure effect is the basis of branding and advertising. Research has been mixed on the effect of mere exposure positively or negatively affecting….

What is Reverse Psychology? How Does Reverse Psychology Apply to Marketing?

Definition: Reverse psychology is a process to promote a belief or behavior that causes an opposite reaction you desire a customer to have. This is more likely to happen when a person has a negative emotional reaction to being persuaded. Reverse Psychology Examples: Selectivity. Using reverse psychology, you can motivate potential customers to take action….

What is Reverse Psychology? How Does Reverse Psychology Apply to Marketing?
What is The Framing Effect? How Does The Framing Effect Apply to Marketing?

What is The Framing Effect? How Does The Framing Effect Apply to Marketing?

Definition: People react differently to a choice if it’s presented as a loss or as a gain. A loss is believed to be more significant than an equivalent gain. Likewise, people have a preference to a sure gain over a possible gain, and a preference to a possible loss over a sure loss. Framing Effect….

What is the Anchoring Bias? How Does the Anchoring Bias Apply to Marketing?

Also Known As: Focalism, Anchoring Effect, Anchoring Heuristic Definition: A bias that relies on the first piece of information received when making decisions, called “the anchor.” Once an anchor is set, new information is based around the anchor. The first number you see changes your perception of any numbers that come after it. Anchoring Bias….

What is the Anchoring Bias? How Does the Anchoring Bias Apply to Marketing?
What is Availability Heuristic? How Does The Availability Heuristic Apply to Marketing?

What is Availability Heuristic? How Does The Availability Heuristic Apply to Marketing?

Definition: A mental shortcut that assumes a product or an idea that comes to mind fast is more important than an idea that is not recalled as fast. This leads to a bias towards new news over timeless truths. Availability Heuristic Examples: Vivid Stories and Hyped Media: A dull and boring event may be more….

What is the Bandwagon Effect? How Does the Bandwagon Effect Apply to Marketing?

Also Known As: Bandwagoning, the effect of fads and trends Definition: People are more likely to accept ideas and trends when they are made aware that more people use that product or service. Bandwagon Effect Examples: Improving Amazon and eBay Listings: Many marketplace sites like Amazon and eBay use the bandwagon effect as a signal….

What is the Bandwagon Effect? How Does the Bandwagon Effect Apply to Marketing?
What is the Barnum Effect? How Does the Barnum Effect Apply to Marketing?

What is the Barnum Effect? How Does the Barnum Effect Apply to Marketing?

Also Known As: The Forer Effect Definition: People give higher accuracy ratings to descriptions that fit their personality, even if the descriptions can apply to a wide range of people. Barnum Effect Examples: Validate Your Customer. Do you enjoy being liked by others? So do your customers. Jif peanut butter likes to affirm choosy moms…..